Phantom Flex4k camera breaks records, filming 1000 fps at 4K

One more buzz creating presentation at NAB 2013 was Vision Research’s Phantom Flex4k camera. It adds a mind-blowing 1000 frames-per-second speed to the expo’s trend of increasing resolution from 1080p to 4k.

Now, water balloon popping and sports blooper clips will eat up even more of our time.

Vision Research’s Phantom Flex4k, 1000 frames-per-second, 4k resolution camera

Phantom Flex4k will reveal new levels of detail in slow-motion photography, reaching 1000 frames-per-second at a a resolution of 4k

Phantom Flex4k  is taking cinema industry standard high-speed filming to mind-boggling resolution

With its previous high-speed cameras having won numerous appraisals and awards in the entertainment, scientific, and military industries, Vision Research clearly has the formula dialed in.

This new iteration in the Phantom series, the Flex4k camera, has a Super 35 CMOS sensor, which means it films with a proper 16:9 frame, straight off the bat, covering approximately 12 stops of dynamic range.

Its PL mount is compatible with Canon EF and Nikon F/G lenses, offering a wide range of optical possibilities.

The extent of Flex4k’s speed starts from 23.98 frames-per-second, like a regular camera. It reaches a record breaking 1000 fps, at 4K. If HD resolution (2K) is enough for a shot, the speed can be cranked up to 2000 fps. Stepping down one more notch, at 720p resolution, the Flex 4K will be able to record a mind-boggling 3000 fps.

To get an idea of how much a 1000 fps at 4K resolution file takes up, only 5 seconds will be recordable at any time on the 64 GB onboard memory. Thankfully, this can be extended using CineMag IV cartridges, up to 2 TeraBytes. The data will be written in either uncompressed raw, or to-be-announced ‘industry standard’ formats.

Redesigned interface and added connectivity options

Compared to predecessors, Flex4k’s has been equipped with a side-panel, for easier operation of controls, featuring a couple of big dials. Additional connectivity options have been added, like audio input and HD-SDI video output.

It will mostly be used as rental, because of its price

As with most high-end production cameras, it will be usually rented out, because of its specific use and steep purchase cost. Depending on memory configuration, the price will be running between $109,900 and $164,900.

A prototype is being demonstrated at the NAB 2013 convention (open until April 11), though the device is still under development.

The Phantom Flex4k camera is programmed to ship later this year.

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